WesternHorseman

Horse Riding Trails Newburgh NY

Local resource for horse riding trails in Newburgh. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to horse trails, as well as advice and content on horseback riding, horse training, hiking, and nature trails.

JT Marks Trucking, Inc.
(845) 255-0006
486 South Mountain Road
Gardiner, NY
 
New Paltz Taxi, Inc.
(845) 255-1550
139 Main Street
New Paltz, NY
 
Joey's Taxi & Transportation
(845) 255-8294 (845) 691-5639
New Paltz, NY
 
Corporate Express, Inc
(718) 376-3800
2229 West Street
Brooklyn, NY
 
Upstate Seg Tours
(585) 293-2540
485 Palmer Rd
Churchville, NY
Prices and/or Promotions
Please visit www.upstatesegtours.com

MetroPool
(845) 834-2900
60 Park Lane, Suite 4A
Highland, NY
 
Anthony's Taxi Shuttling Service
(845) 255-2870
5 Southside Ave. Apt. #10D
New Paltz, NY
 
Patricia Fitzgerald
(845) 424-3800
Po Box 248
Garrison, NY
Agency
Hudson Highlands Travel, Inc.
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Destinations
Africa, Australia / New Zealand, Canada, Caribbean, Europe-Western, U.S. - Hawaii, U.S. - Northeast, U.S. - Southeast, U.S. - West
Specialities
Cruising / Cruise Lines, Family Fun, Honeymoon, Religious, Senior / Mature Adult
Website
www.highlands.com

Data Provided By:
Transit Valley Dev. Inc.
(716) 688-5255
107 Wellingwood Dr.
East Amherst, NY
 
Let's Go Fishin'
(315) 250-8947
103 Stoughton Ave
Massena, NY
Prices and/or Promotions
Visit our website Letsgofishin.us

Data Provided By:

Living Springs Ranch

The ranch horses are, in fact, a part of Moyer Ministries Inc., and play important roles in the outreach programs Ronnie and Becky Moyer use to positively influence people of all ages. In addition to horsemanship and rodeo Bible camps, the couple's active music ministry involves them with many organizations, such as the Fellowship of Christian Cowboys.

Ranch facilities include a large multipurpose building with kitchen, baths and attached indoor round pen, a small bunkhouse (campers are welcome), practice bucking and roping machines, barn, outdoor arena and corrals. In addition to trail rides and riding instruction, Living Springs also offers team sports, such as volleyball and softball, and campfire entertainment.

Riding activities regularly scheduled throughout the year include: Wrangler's Weekend: basic horsemanship skills for third- through sixth-grade students or for those in sixth through 12th grades.

Colt-Starting Clinic: basic instructional skills taught from the horse's point of view for sixth- through 12th-grade students, with student-parent weekends also available.

Ranch Retreat: ranch riding, roping, and working stock for sixth- through 12th-grade students and their parents.

Rodeo Bible Camp: basic instruction in barrel racing, pole bending, goat tying, rough-stock events and breakaway, calf and team roping with emphasis on safe equipment and riding techniques; for students in sixth through 12th grades.

For information, contact Living Springs Ranc...

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The Beauty of Weekday Trail Riding

I camp Sunday through Thursday night, or possibly Friday morning so I can enjoy the beauty and solitude of the trails, clean facilities and my horse's quiet mind, because he's not distracted by other horses. The whole park becomes a private enclave.

Here are a few tips for weekday trail riding.

  • Call before you haul to make sure the facilities are open. Some camps are closed to overnight visitors on Sunday and/or Monday nights.

  • Make a reservation, if necessary.

  • Tell someone exactly where you're going. Leave them a map with the location marked, and provide camp/park contact numbers.

  • If possible, arrive late Sunday afternoon. Often riders leaving camp will share any unusual circumstances of which to be aware.

  • Choose a campsite near the park's entry. It's easier to navigate your rig from that area, and emergency vehicles can find you.

  • Make an emergency contact card from a brightly colored 5-by-7-inch file card. On it, list the date, time and area you'll be riding and your cell-phone number. Update the card every time you leave camp.

  • Secure a cell phone to someone's body, not a saddle.

  • Pack saddlebags with appropriate items: a compass, temporary horseshoe, sunscreen, insect repellant, a multipurpose tool, collapsible water bucket, first-aid kit, food and water.

  • Plan your turnaround point, so you can return to camp before dark.

  • Practice zero-impact camping and trail riding...
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