WesternHorseman

Horse Twitches Davenport IA

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Horse Twitches. You will find informative articles about Horse Twitches, including "Safe Twitching". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Davenport, IA that can help answer your questions about Horse Twitches.

Yore Pet's Barber
(309) 762-8883
831-18th Avenue
Moline, IL
Description
Shar has owned the salon for 21 years and has been styling for 30 years, Deb has been her assistant for 5 years. Shar is a member of ISPDGA and certified thru WWPA. we study the art of styling the homeopathic way, all natural products. We groom local Vets dogs and cater to the very picky client.

Bettendorf Veterinary Hospital
(563) 332-8387
3510 Belmont Road
Bettendorf, IA
Description
Professional Groomer with over 9 years experience. Caring and gentle pet and show grooms for cats and dogs. We offer nail trims, gland expression, ear cleaning, bath, hand blow dry, and customized trim included in each haircut. Add-on services like nail filing and hair coloring are available as well. Open Monday-Saturday.

North Brady Animal Hospital
(563) 391-9522
6011 N Brady St
Davenport, IA
 
Terri'S Dog Styling School
(563) 391-5535
3848 N Division St
Davenport, IA
 
Dog Styles Grooming Salon
(563) 326-2136
1224 E Locust St
Davenport, IA
 
Teagarden Pet Salon and School
(563) 359-7387
2367 Cumberland Sq
Bettendorf, IA
Description
Owner Linda Teagarden has been grooming over 35 years, specializing in scissoring, gentle treatment, all in an upscale, clean shop.No cage dryers used.Mon-Sat.

All Paws Pet Salon
(309) 787-2874
1021 4th st W
Milan, IL
Description
I have recently open my own salon. I have had a very steady client base for 2 years. I like to spend time with each animal so they get to know me and what i want from them. Appointments available Tuesday thur. Saturday

Bell Animal Hospital
(563) 322-4901
1316 W Locust St
Davenport, IA
 
Abel Keppy Animal Hospital
(563) 391-2555
3904 Lillie Ave
Davenport, IA
 
Riverview Dog & Cat Groom
(309) 788-0040
5103 11th St
Rock Island, IL
 

Safe Twitching

Written by Melissa Cassutt

There are three basic types of restraint that can be effective during an emergency: location restraint, physical restraint and chemical restraint.  Colorado veterinarian Ruth Sorensen discusses different techniques of twitching, a form of physical restraint that can help control your horse as you address an emergency.

In part two, Sorensen explains how to properly apply three different types of hobbles. Our series on emergency restraint techniques concludes with an article on different types of location restraint, chemical restraint, and special techniques to restrain a foal, mule or donkey.
Safe Twitching

There are two areas on a horse that can be effectively and humanely twitched—the neck and the nose. Vulnerable anatomy, such as ears, joints or genitals should never be used for restraint. Besides being illegal in some states, ear twitches can cause permanent damage and may actually provoke aggression in some horses.

There are a few situations in which a twitch should not be used. These include if a horse is:

• Thrashing. To ensure the safety of the horse and the handler, a horse that is thrashing (as is often the case with a bad colic) should not be twitched or restrained with any other technique.

• Hurt in the area to be twitched. This may sound obvious, but it still deserves to be noted. Do not apply a twitch to an injured area, such as a sunburned muzzle or a shoulder suffering from a laceration.

• Acting up. Twitching should be used only in an emergency, and only to restrain a horse long enough to prevent further injury as the situation is being handled. Twitching should never be used as a form of discipline.

Nose twitches can be applied by hand or with a piece of equipment.
To apply a nose twitch by hand, grasp the “meaty” part of the upper lip under the nostrils, and while keeping a firm grip, twist your hand. As you hold this twitch, pulse your hand and gently massage the lip with your fingers.

As for twitching equipment, there are three basic types of nose twitches:

• Humane twitches. These metal clamps hinge at one end to squeeze the upper lip, and fasten at the opposite end with a snap. Though called humane twitches, Sorensen says they can end up causing injury by pinching or slipping loose.

• Rope-end twitches. These twitches are comprised of a long stick with a rope loop at one end. The loop is applied to the upper lip and twisted tight. As with the humane twitch, these can also have a problem with slipping.

• Chain-end twitches. These twitches are the same as a rope-end twitch, but instead of a rope loop, they have a chain loop, which provides more grip.

Whatever type of twitch you use, it’s important to stay active and aware when twitching a horse. If using your hands, “work the twitch” by pulsing your hands and massaging the area; if using a piece of equipment, gently and slowly roll the handle over and back, being careful not to loosen the twitch.

Note that ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from WesternHorseman.com

IA Equine Law

Iowa

Under Iowa Law, a domesticated animal professional is not liable for damages suffered by, an injury to, or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of domesticated animal activities, pursuant to Iowa Code Chapter 673.  You are assuming the inherent risks of participating in this domesticated animal activity.