WesternHorseman

Horse Twitches Saint Paul MN

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Horse Twitches. You will find informative articles about Horse Twitches, including "Safe Twitching". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Saint Paul, MN that can help answer your questions about Horse Twitches.

Dog City Walkers
(612) 327-8617
Minneapolis, MN
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pet Transportation, Errand Service, Alternating Lights/Curtains, House Sitting, Grooming, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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Don't Make Me Beg
(651) 222-0313
792 Grand Ave
Saint Paul, MN
Description
Don't Make Me Beg groomer, Cynthia Gilbert, has 20 yrs experience with Vet Tech background. Our Staff are friendly and provide quality products, services in a peaceful atmosphere. Basic Dog or Cat services include bath, brush, blow dry, nails, teeth brushing, anal glands, and bandana or bows. Upgrades available. Open Tuesday-Saturday.

Animal House Pet Styling
(651) 787-0691
2612 Rice St.
Saint Paul, MN
Description
A full service styling salon offering grooming for any breed of dog or cat. Uses only top quality shampoos and equipment. All Stylists have 1st class service. Open Monday-Saturday by appt. only.

Anna Hawks
(651) 787-0691
2612 Rice Street
Saint Paul, MN
Description
Anna Hawks, CMG is an IPG Certified Master Groomer, ISCC Certified, National Pet Grooming Competitior and is currently the President of the Minnesota Proffesional Pet Groomers Associtation. Anna has been working in the NE Metro area for many years and has the experience and knowledge to ensure that you and your pet recieve a comfortable and pleasant grooming experience. She uses premium products and is constantly striving to learn and stay current in the pet styling industry.Vet Recommended

A Diamond In The Ruff Pet Grooming
(651) 455-5753
536 5th Ave. So.
South Saint Paul, MN
Description
The groomer, Jenny, is a life long lover of dogs and cats. I am a grooming school graduate with a true passion for working with our furry friends. My shop offers a low stress environment, little distraction and a lot of specialized attention your pet may require. Since every pet is unique... you choose the doo! The average stay is usually less then 2 hours. Evening and weekend appointments are available. Specialized services are available.
Services
Grooms most/all breeds of dogs, Special Care Appointments , Cat Grooming Services, Offers Large Dog (70+ Pounds) Grooming Services

Paws At Your Door Grooming
(612) 499-0399
944 Beacon Lane
Apple Valley, MN

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Bubbles & Couture
(651) 457-1815
883 Smith Ave
Saint Paul, MN
Description
All Natural, Organic Pet Spa And Boutique, Catering To Your Pet's Wellness. Come Visit And Let Your Pets Be Rejuvenated By Our Signature Organic Aromatherapy Spa Treatments And Indulged Your Pets With Natural, Organic Treats.

Wiggles & Wags Pet Salon
(651) 455-1744
433 E. Mendota Road
Saint Paul, MN
Description
With the love and compassion I have for animals my mission is to provide a safe, quiet, and professional salon environment. Each pet is treated as if it were my own, with calm and loving care. And, I in turn gain the love and trust of these special animals.

Dig It Dog Grooming
(651) 775-9856
1724 Lexington Ave. N.
Saint Paul, MN
Description
My name is Stephanie Hahn. I provide a gentle, low-stress grooming experience for your pet. I personally groom all clients' dogs. I believe that an essential part of providing grooming service is building a personal relationship with my clients, so that you will receive personalized service, and never be treated like a number.

South Paw Pet Grooming
(651) 451-2199
512 Southview Blvd.
South Saint Paul, MN
Description
It is our goal at south Paw to groom your pet to your complete satisfaction while providing the best possile experience for them. We also groom cats. We are the best groomers around, paws down!

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Safe Twitching

Written by Melissa Cassutt

There are three basic types of restraint that can be effective during an emergency: location restraint, physical restraint and chemical restraint.  Colorado veterinarian Ruth Sorensen discusses different techniques of twitching, a form of physical restraint that can help control your horse as you address an emergency.

In part two, Sorensen explains how to properly apply three different types of hobbles. Our series on emergency restraint techniques concludes with an article on different types of location restraint, chemical restraint, and special techniques to restrain a foal, mule or donkey.
Safe Twitching

There are two areas on a horse that can be effectively and humanely twitched—the neck and the nose. Vulnerable anatomy, such as ears, joints or genitals should never be used for restraint. Besides being illegal in some states, ear twitches can cause permanent damage and may actually provoke aggression in some horses.

There are a few situations in which a twitch should not be used. These include if a horse is:

• Thrashing. To ensure the safety of the horse and the handler, a horse that is thrashing (as is often the case with a bad colic) should not be twitched or restrained with any other technique.

• Hurt in the area to be twitched. This may sound obvious, but it still deserves to be noted. Do not apply a twitch to an injured area, such as a sunburned muzzle or a shoulder suffering from a laceration.

• Acting up. Twitching should be used only in an emergency, and only to restrain a horse long enough to prevent further injury as the situation is being handled. Twitching should never be used as a form of discipline.

Nose twitches can be applied by hand or with a piece of equipment.
To apply a nose twitch by hand, grasp the “meaty” part of the upper lip under the nostrils, and while keeping a firm grip, twist your hand. As you hold this twitch, pulse your hand and gently massage the lip with your fingers.

As for twitching equipment, there are three basic types of nose twitches:

• Humane twitches. These metal clamps hinge at one end to squeeze the upper lip, and fasten at the opposite end with a snap. Though called humane twitches, Sorensen says they can end up causing injury by pinching or slipping loose.

• Rope-end twitches. These twitches are comprised of a long stick with a rope loop at one end. The loop is applied to the upper lip and twisted tight. As with the humane twitch, these can also have a problem with slipping.

• Chain-end twitches. These twitches are the same as a rope-end twitch, but instead of a rope loop, they have a chain loop, which provides more grip.

Whatever type of twitch you use, it’s important to stay active and aware when twitching a horse. If using your hands, “work the twitch” by pulsing your hands and massaging the area; if using a piece of equipment, gently and slowly roll the handle over and back, being careful not to loosen the twitch.

Note that ...

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Local Events

UST Executive Conference on the Future of Health Care
Dates: 11/5/2020 – 11/5/2020
Location:
University of St.Thomas Saint Paul
View Details